5 Easy Ways to Grow your Spa Business fast

| May 6, 2020 | Reply

By Lydia Sarfati – Founder and Owner of Sarkli-Repêchage

From working as a spa consultant and visiting salons and spas all over the world, I know that while upgrading space and services can make a big difference in increasing business, there are several improvements that can be made instantly and without much cost to increase morale and a spa’s bottom line.

Read below and ask yourself if your business could benefit from these fast and easy upgrades and see how they can be done.

  1. Re-Energize Your Spa

Is your spa energized? Many times I witness a lack of energy from spas in comparison to the music and excitement at a hair salon. My mantra: Make your spa fun!

With spas tucked away, out of plain sight, many of the benefits of skin care are also hidden. Incorporating a Facial Bar that brings the services out in the open and hosting spa events can turn this around.

  1. Respond to Negative Clients with Positivity

Are negative clients affecting your business? Your staff must be trained to turn every frown upside down, from their own to their clients. All experiences should be made positive.

Even demanding and unpleasant clients are paying customers who must be treated with positive energy and a smile.

Positivity can sometimes make a difference on even the toughest client. EMT’s, for example, are trained to focus on patient care, no matter how belligerent or uncooperative they are being.  How much easier to do this when you are not facing a life or death situation with your client!

Therefore, it’s always important to focus on the customer’s needs and treat him/her to a great facial experience.

  1. Improve Your Spa’s Image

What does your spa say to your customers? I encourage spas to enhance the client experience with extra touches like ironed sheets and robes and fresh flowers.

Employees, meanwhile, should be friendly team players, well-groomed and educated enough to engage visitors in conversation.

Spa owners should establish an etiquette; for instance, should clients be greeted as Mrs./Ms., or with their first name? Make sure each client is welcomed, that their coat is taken, that they are offered a drink and have a fun selection of reading materials to choose from.

Notice that these extras aren’t always expensive.  Being considerate, polite and well-mannered adds priceless value for almost no cost!

 

  1. Train for Retail Sales

Is retail important to employees? Proper training in the art of recommendation is another way to upgrade your salon and spa without spending a cent!

Retail should account for about 50% of a spa’s gross sales. To reach this sales percentage, spa staff should never ask their clients “do you need anything today?” The response will almost always be “no.” Instead ask “What are your concerns today?” This leads to a discussion and consultation and, often, a sale.

Recommendations are the spa worker’s professional duty. Remember, clients are coming to you to provide the best solutions for their skin, which always includes proper home care

  1. Know Your Customers and Their Needs

Do you know your customers?  Don’t try to sell anti-aging to a young consumer. Understand each client’s needs and what they want.

Millennials may be more partial to express treatments, like sheet masks, but generation Xers will be your most time-stressed clients. Baby boomers, may want to be pampered, while clients 70 and above may seek relaxation, a soothing touch, and could respond better to the use or warm oils vs cold creams. And men would like express treatments along with shaves and after-shave treatments.

Lockdown is the perfect time to stay home, learn, grow & upskill yourself and business.

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Lydia Sarfati is a Polish-born American esthetician, entrepreneur, consultant and author. She is credited with having introduced seaweed-based skin treatments in the United States. In 1980, she founded the Sarkli-Repêchage, a seaweed-based cosmetics company, together with her husband David Sarfati.

Category: Spa Reviews

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